Under-the-Weather Cooking

Easy Recuperating Foods

chicken noodle soup
Egg Drop Chicken Noodle Soup

Looking for under-the-weather recipes? This egg drop chicken noodle soup is the easiest thing to do. And you know how chicken soup is always the best go-to food when you’re not feeling well. Check out these easy-on-the-tummy foods to eat when you’re recuperating from surgery or the flu.

  • chicken noodle soup
  • cream of chicken soup
  • cream of rice soup
  • carrots and potatoes
  • cottage cheese
  • Cream of Wheat
  • potato bread
  • cinnamon raisin bread
  • sugar-free Jello
  • sugar-free pudding
  • ripe banana
  • egg and cheese omelet
  • chicken noodle egg drop soup
  • potato soup
  • spinach
  • crackers

There are times in life when you can only eat bland foods or just chicken noodle soup – which can become quite boring after a few days. In November, I spent a week or two with congestion. Then, I was in the hospital. I was told to eat mostly bland food, though I could eat whatever I liked. The two eating lifestyles – whatever I like to eat and bland food – don’t quite match up, however.

Before proceeding, I want to let you know that I am not a licensed nutritionist, nor am I a medical professional. If you need to follow a bland diet, see your medical practitioner or someone qualified to give you the correct foods for your needs. I’m only sharing what I liked and ate on this particular diet/bland food experience.

Twice, I even splurged and ate chicken too soon. Back to easy foods (chicken tasted good but not on the same digest scale as easy/bland foods), I started craving vegetables¬†(good thing ’cause I LOVE veggies).

At first, I only ate carrots. Although vegetables are good sources of nutrition, not all may be acceptable on a bland diet. Spinach sounded good to me, so I added that to my vegetable list. The nice thing about this list is you can make multiple kinds of omelets which are good no matter if they are for breakfast, brunch, lunch, or dinner.

  1. Cheese Omelet
  2. Spinach Omelet
  3. Carrot Omelet
  4. Cheese Spinach & Carrot Omelet
  5. Omelet with avocado

But there is another recipe my friend, Denise, told me about that I had not ever made before. Egg Drop Chicken Noodle Soup. She and I were talking on the phone, and I mentioned the fact that I was about to go eat chicken noodle soup again. She gave me the idea of cooking homemade chicken noodle soup and dropping eggs into it. I thought about that a minute. How would an egg drop be in canned soup? I tried it, and it was delicious. Here’s the recipe for you (though it’s easy enough that you wouldn’t need a recipe):

Chicken Noodle Egg Drop Soup

Chicken Noodle Egg Drop Soup

easy egg drop and chicken noodle soup combined

Course Soup
Cuisine American

Ingredients

  • 1 can Chicken Noodle Soup
  • 2 medium Carrots
  • 1 Egg

Instructions

  1. Empty can of soup in a medium to large pot.

  2. Fill can with water and add to the soup.

  3. Add previously cooked carrots to the soup.

  4. Beat an egg.

  5. As the soup begins to boil, drop the egg little by little into the soup.

  6. Gradually stir the soup so that the egg doesn't all drop into one big clump.

  7. The boiling water will cook the egg similar to scrambled egg texture.

  8. Serve with crackers.

Since surgery, I have backed off on the soups. But the light diet requirements really helped me to go through the holidays without overeating – until my anniversary. My husband and I treated ourselves to a romantic dinner out at a fabulous Houston restaurant. The menu entree I chose tasted amazing and inspired a new grits recipe and blog post I shared on the blog yesterday. Check out the recipe and also the photo of the awesome lamb and grits dish I devoured at the Spindletop.

Now that we’re into the second week of 2019 (and I have turned another year older on January 8th), I have been focusing on cooking and baking simple, easy, and nutritious recipes.

Some of the organic and nutritious staples in my pantry this month include organic cocoa powder, carob chips, and King Arthur’s Organic White Whole Wheat Flour.

The baked mini bundts, bread loaves, cookies and muffins I’ve made with the whole wheat flour and carob chips have brought mixed responses from family members. Two aunts and an uncle have thanked me for the gift bread loaves I’ve brought and have been gracious to try them out. My little two-year-old grandson, though, loved my whole wheat banana bread as much as I did. I was visiting, and my daughter mentioned one day, “Mom, I hope you didn’t want any more banana bread.” Little Grand Man had pulled a kitchen table chair up to the counter, stood upon it, and helped himself to the rest of the bread. He was walking around the house, eating the bread, as pieces of bread dropped everywhere he walked.

The texture of the whole wheat bread is different than when using white flour, somewhat heavier. And when you love chocolate chip cookies, carob chips definitely do not equal the taste. Changing to whole foods does take some adapting.

Be sure to visit throughout this month to find out about the healthy recipes I’ve been trying out and the new natural sugar dishes I’ve been adapting to. Seriously, once you stop consuming foods laden with sugar, it doesn’t take much time to get used to being without them.

Have a sweet tooth? You owe it to yourself to switch over to naturally sweet foods. Like sweet potatoes, for instance. Did you hear this week about the lady who lived to 114? Her family said she often ate sweet potatoes. Who knows if that had anything to do with how she lived so long. But think about it. Those potatoes are naturally sweet and don’t need marshmallows and brown sugar to make them taste better. Food for thought.

Best wishes for a happy new year and good health!

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